Category Archives: Escherichia coli O157:H7

NFORMATION FOR SHARING WITH PARENTS AND FAMILIES HAMBURGER DISEASE OR BARBECUE SYNDROME VTEC GASTROENTERITIS: part 2

How can the disease be treated? • Anyone with symptoms of bloody diarrhea, severe vomiting, bad abdominal cramps or a decrease in urination during a diarrheal illness should see their doctor. • Antidiarrheal medication should not be taken.

NFORMATION FOR SHARING WITH PARENTS AND FAMILIES HAMBURGER DISEASE OR BARBECUE SYNDROME VTEC GASTROENTERITIS: part 1

Where do VTEC come from? Most outbreaks of vtec gasf roenteritis have occurred after consumption of undercooked cont aminated ground beef (hamburger) but outbreaks have also been reported after consumption of unpasteurized milk, cheese or yoghurt, cold cuts, unpasteurized apple … Continue reading

Escherichia coli O157:H7, other verotoxin-producing E coli and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood: RECOMMENDATIONS

Public health: 1. vtec including E coli O157:H7 are nationally notifiable, but early reporting to the local public health authorities must be encouraged so outbreaks can be contained. 2. Until further information is available, we recommend that children with E … Continue reading

Escherichia coli O157:H7, other verotoxin-producing E coli and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood: PREVENTION

PREVENTION Measures that can effectively prevent human vtec infection have not been stud I ed extensively. Active immunization is not yet available. Proposed methods of reducing the rate of exposure to vtec include reducing contamination of meat in slaughterhouses and … Continue reading

Escherichia coli O157:H7, other verotoxin-producing E coli and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood: part 7

HOW IS HUS TREATED? If hus is suspected, the child should be referred to a centre with a specialist skilled in the management of these patients. Although large bo I uses of oral or intravenous flu i ds are usually … Continue reading

Escherichia coli O157:H7, other verotoxin-producing E coli and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood: part 6

HOW SHOULD VTEC INFECTION BE TREATED? At present, treatment of vtec infection is primarily supportive. Antimotility drugs are totally contraindicated, not only because they interfere with recognition of dehydration, but also because they may prolong the time of exposure to … Continue reading

Escherichia coli O157:H7, other verotoxin-producing E coli and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood: part 5

HOW DOES HUS DEVELOP? The clinical features of hus are thought to be initiated by the direct effect of verotoxin on renal endothelial cells, which results in cell swel t ing, local intravascular coagulation with plate t et aggregation, mechanical … Continue reading

Escherichia coli O157:H7, other verotoxin-producing E coli and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood: part 4

HOW ARE VTEC INFECTION AND HUS RECOGNIZED CLINICALLY? Gastro tntestinal infection with E coli O157:H7 most commonly begins with a crampy, watery diarrhea after an incubation period of three to four days (range one to 10 days). Infection may also … Continue reading

Escherichia coli O157:H7, other verotoxin-producing E coli and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood: part 3

HOW COMMON IS E COLI O157:H7 INFECTION? In many regions of Canada, E coli 0157:H7 is the second most common bacterial pathogen found in stools submitted to clinical labo iatories, fal i ing just behind Campylobacter species . During the … Continue reading

Escherichia coli O157:H7, other verotoxin-producing E coli and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood: part 2

HOW ARE E COLI O157:H7 AND OTHER VTEC INFECTIONS IDENTIFIED? Vtec including E coli O157:H7 require special methods for detection in the laboratory. Microbiology laboratories can screen for E coli O157:H7 by inoculating stool specimens onto MacConkey medium coniaining sorbitol … Continue reading

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